Unscramble Craps

This article includes a list of references , but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Hard Ways Set 1: In either case, all single or multi-roll proposition bets may be placed in either of the two rounds. This set is equally as good as the Hard Ways set 1 for rolling points of 5, 6, 8, and 9. Dealers will usually announce if bets are working unless otherwise called off.

3 Anagrams of Craps

Disclaimer

If you, or the Shooter, roll a 7 or 11, you win. If you, or the Shooter, roll a 2, 3, or 12, you lose. If you, or the Shooter, roll any other number, that number becomes the point number.

If you, or the Shooter, roll the point number before rolling a 7, you win. If you, or the Shooter, roll a 7 before rolling the point number, you lose. The Shooter continues to roll the dice until he or she "7s out", whereupon the dice pass to the next player. You don't have to be the Shooter to make a Pass Line Bet. Any other number rolled becomes the point number. If the point number is rolled prior to a 7, the bet loses.

As with the Pass Line Bet, anyone can make this bet, Shooter or not. To make a Come Bet, you would place the chips you want to wager in the Come area of the table. If the Shooter rolls a 7 or an 11, the Come Bet wins. If the Shooter rolls a 2, 3 or 12, the bet is lost. If any other number comes up, that number becomes the point number.

If the Shooter rolls the point number before rolling a 7, the Come Bet wins. The Come Bet and its point number are independent of the Pass Line point number. The bet wins if the Shooter rolls a 2 or a 3 on the roll after the bet is made.

If a 12 is rolled, the bet is a tie. The bet is lost if the roll is a 7 or an If any other number comes up, that becomes the point number. This is called an Odds Bet. The Odds Bet is placed behind the original bet once a point number has been established.

All Odds Bets may be removed or reduced at any time. Odds are paid based on true odds and win if the original bet wins, and vice versa. The table you are playing at will display the corresponding odds. You can take double odds up to the table maximum. Please ask your dealer for any needed clarification. The numbers you can make a Buy Bet on are 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and The basic rules are: A Lay Bet is essentially the opposite.

Stanford Wong writes in 'Wong on Dice' that most careful shooters he observed were not keeping both dice on axis more than the random expectations, but were achieving influence through correlation. Based on my faith in Wong, the following tables are all under the assumption of correlation shooting only.

There are 84 distinct ways to set the dice. In my analysis for this page, I examined all 84 sets, and noted the best set for each bet. The following sets are the only ones that came up as the best for the bets studied. For practical purposes, the only sets you need to know are Hard Ways set 1 and Sevens set 1. Dice Settings Hard Ways Set 1: This is the king of the dice sets. It is the best, or tied for best, for rolling any point before a 7.

Hard Ways Set 2: This set is equally as good as the Hard Ways set 1 for rolling points of 4, 5, 9, and It is also the best set on a come out roll for the don't pass bet. Hard Ways Set 3: This set is equally as good as the Hard Ways set 1 for rolling points of 5, 6, 8, and 9. In my opinion, this set is the best for rolling sevens. It is the best set on the come out roll for pass line bets. It also tied for best for rolling a seven after a don't pass bet on points of 4, 5, 9, and This set is the best, or tied for best, for rolling a seven after a don't pass bet on all points.

This set is the best, or tied for best, for rolling sevens after making a don't pass bet on points of 5, 6, 8, and 9. The skill factor is defined as the percentage of double-pitch throws that the skillful shooter turns into zero-pitch throws. In this case, the probability of a double-pitch would be All other outcomes would be the same as that of a random shooter. Most of the time the shooter is going to want to avoid sevens. By far, the most common metric for measuring dice control is the "Sevens: Rolls Ratio," or RSR.

I believe that acronym is a misnomer, because the rolls to sevens ratio should be abbreviated RSR. So, I am going to break with convention and call it that. A skillful shooter should be able to throw fewer sevens, and thus increase the RSR above 6. As a basis of comparison to other sources, I will include the RSR in my house edge tables.

The following table shows the player advantage on the pass line bet, with X odds, according to skill factor. I measured the house edge two different ways. The column for the house edge with the Hard Way set HW 1 , is the house edge if the shooter always uses the Hard Way set 1, even on a come out roll. The reason for listing the house edge for the Hard Way set alone is that many shooters also make come bets, which would lose on a seven on a come out roll.

I've observed some so-called skillful shooters using the Hard Way set on a come out roll, even with no come bets. I believe the reason for this is ease in record keeping.

The following table shows the player advantage on the don't pass line bet, with X odds, according to skill factor. As with the pass bet, I measured the house edge two different ways. The first applies if the shooter uses the Seven set 2 on every throw. The second applies if the shooter uses the Hard Way set 2 on the come out roll, and the Seven set 2 on all other throws.

Comparing this table to the above table, the player advantage on the pass bet is greater with a skill factor of 0.

Words made by unscrambling the letters C R A P S