How to Beat Live $1/$2 No-Limit Hold'em Poker Cash Games

This page was last edited on 13 May , at A few casinos play with a 9-low qualifier instead, but this is rare. One of the byproducts of thinking about poker on a per-session basis is "manufacturing wins. Wird vor allem in Turnieren angewendet. If you win a pot before the showdown, then you have the option to either muck your cards without revealing them to your opponents or to show the hand before you muck, thus revealing the hand you had. Make your big hand and value bet. Pot-Limit A structure of the game in which bets and raises are capped by the current size of the pot.

Relative hand strength in no limit Texas hold'em

An overview of the most important poker strategy fundamentals

The button is in an advantageous position, for he acts last in a betting round. Buy-In The cost to enter a tournament, or the minimum amount needed to sit down in a cash game at a specific table. Usually 20 times the big blind. Call To contribute the minimum amount of money to the pot necessary to continue playing a hand. Check To pass on betting. If there's no action bet to you, there's nothing to call.

If you don't want to bet, you can just "check. Check-Raise A check-raise is made when a player checks on the first opportunity to bet and later raises any subsequent bet in the same betting round.

Cold Call To call two or more bets on your turn. If a pot has been bet and raised before it gets to you, and then you call, you're cold calling. Connector Sequential pocket cards.

A 5 of clubs and 6 of hearts would be connectors. If the connectors are the same suit, they are "suited connectors" - e. Community Cards Cards that are dealt face up in the center of the table, available for all players to use in making a hand.

Counterfeit A duplicate card on the board that greatly devalues your hand. If you have a pair of 6's in your hand, and the board is ace-ace, and the river card is a 7, you've been "counterfeited. Any other player with a card higher than a 6 in his hand now beats your hand.

Cut-Off The position to the immediate right of the button. Dealer The player who shuffles the deck and deals the cards. Dealer Button The button often a plastic disk in live poker that indicates the dealer. It is passed clockwise after every hand.

Draw Remaining in a hand in the hopes of improving it. For example, you don't have anything concrete yet, but need one or more cards for a straight or a flush. If you call or raise a round of betting to see if the needed card s come, you are said to be "drawing. You can also draw for a three of a kind, full house, or better.

Draw Out To receive a card that transforms your hand from a losing hand to a winning hand. Drawing Dead You're drawing, but it's futile because there is not one card in the deck that will create a winning hand for you. If you have two pairs and hope to make a full house on the river, but your opponent already has four of a kind, you are "drawing dead.

Flop The first three community cards dealt out after the first round of betting is complete. Flush A poker hand consisting of five cards of the same suit. Fold To give up by placing your cards face down on the table, losing whatever you have bet so far. You only fold when you think your hand is too weak to compete against the other players. Four of a Kind A hand containing all four cards of the same rank. Full House A hand consisting of a three of a kind and a different pair.

Gutshot A straight completed from "inside" by one possible card. For example, if your pocket cards are 5 and 6 and the flop shows king, a 7 and only a 7 on the turn or river would complete your "gutshot" straight. It is the opposite of an open-ended straight, which is completed by any one of two cards from the outside. A gutshot is half as likely to hit as an open-ended straight. Hand Five cards, made of a player's pocket cards and the community cards.

Heads-Up Playing a pot or tournament against only one other player. Implied Odds Taking future calls from your fellow players into consideration when you are drawing to something. If you draw successfully, you expect they'll call with their hands. These funds are speculative and not concrete, as they aren't in the middle yet and won't be unless you hit your card and they call your bets - hence, "implied. Kicker If you have the same hand as another player at showdown, the one with the highest kicker wins the pot.

If the board is , and you have ace-king and your opponent has king-queen, you win because your ace beats his king. Your ace is the "kicker.

Limp Slang word for calling, implying it's not an aggressive move. Limit A structure of the game in which bets and raises are capped at a fixed amount.

Muck All the discarded cards in a hand. If a player folds, he tosses his hand "into the muck. No-Limit A structure of the game in which players can bet their entire stack. There's a minimum to what you can bet, but not a maximum. Nuts The best possible hand one can have at a given moment. For example, if you have pocket 7's, and the flop is , you have the "nuts" at this point, as trip 7's would be the best possible hand. If the turn card is a 5, you would no longer have the nuts, as that honor now goes to anyone holding , making a straight.

If the river is the last 7, you'd again have the nuts, as your hand is once again the best possible hand. Off-suit Holding pocket cards of different suits.

Omaha A variety of hold'em in which players receive 4 hole cards and must use exactly two of them, together with 3 of the 5 board cards, to make a hand.

Open-Handed A category of games characterized by a part of each player's hand being exposed. Over-Pair In hold'em, a pair in the hole that is larger than any community card on the board.

They're first-level thinkers, thinking only of their two cards and nothing else. They're clueless to the fact that you've folded the last 30 hands and are now betting hard into them. What they're thinking is, "I has a pair of jacks; how much? These players are your targets and the source of the bulk of your winnings. You'll often hear new players lament about how it's impossible to beat fish because all they do is call. This sort of thinking is so fundamentally wrong it's laughable.

Players who call too much are the ATMs of the poker world, readily dispensing money to whoever has the patience to wait for a good hand. You play tight, you make top pair or better and you bet! Not exactly groundbreaking stuff. Play ABC poker, make your good hands and bet them.

Loose-passive calling stations will do what they do best: So let them call, stop bluffing them, and value bet your good hands relentlessly. When you play tight before the flop you make your post-flop decisions easier.

By playing solid hands before the flop you will make solid hands after the flop. When you eliminate marginal hands from your repertoire you'll find yourself with fewer difficult decisions after the flop. Your goal is to flop top pair with a good kicker or better. You have to avoid getting caught up in the table flow. Stick to playing tight and focus on playing hands that can flop big. These hands are already made for you.

A single pair is often good enough to win at showdown so when you start with one you're ahead of the game. Big pocket pairs are such big favorites that you should always raise them for value when nobody has raised in front of you. With aces, kings, queens and even jacks you should often even reraise. The profit in these hands comes from when you flop an overpair to the board or a set. When you do, bet. In a game where most of your opponents are loose-passive your kicker will make you a lot of money.

Top-pair hands do better against one opponent than many so keep that in mind when choosing your bet sizes. These are hands that are rarely going to win at showdown unimproved but when they hit they make big-pot hands.

A big-pot hand is a hand like a set, a full house, a straight or a flush. They are speculative hands because they have to hit before they'll be worth anything. They rely on the implied odds that you win your opponent's stack when you do hit. Ideally you would like to see the flop as cheaply as possible with these hands.

Speculative hands do best when played in position, so be wary about playing them from up front. Pocket pairs make huge hands when they flop sets.

Sets are often hidden and you can easily stack someone who has top pair or an overpair. For that reason it's OK to limp pocket pairs from any position. When facing a raise you have to think about your opponent. If he's a tight player and unlikely to pay you off when you hit, you're best off folding. If, however, he's a loose player or you're multiway with more than one loose player , you can call a reasonably sized raise to play for "set value.

The main thing about pocket pairs is that when you hit a set you should almost always be looking for the best way to get all your money into the pot. Suited connectors are great hands -- played within reason. They do make both straights and flushes which are both big-pot hands. When you're in early position you're best off folding low suited connectors. All others should be folded. Suited connectors are hands that play well in position.

More often than not you're going to miss the flop or hit a weak one-pair hand. Playing them from out of position , in contrast, is going to put you in too many marginal spots after the flop.

Suited connectors should rarely be played versus a raise unless you're on the button and it is a multiway pot or the raise is very small. This can definitely change depending on the game you're in. Suited connectors have much more value these days and are a viable hand to play from more positions and facing raises. Suited aces are decent speculative hands because they can flop the nut-flush draw and they do have some high-card strength with the ace.

Nut-flush draws obviously have value because you can stack smaller flushes. The problem with flushes though is that they are right there in the open. Everyone is always aware when a flush draw comes in and as such it's sometimes difficult to get paid. Suited aces are good hands but not good enough to limp in from any position. You should be more willing to limp the closer to the button you get.

Against a raise suited aces should seldom be played. You're not going to flop a flush nearly as often as you flop a pair of aces with a weak kicker.

A weak pair of aces can be a curse. You feel like you have top pair and should see a showdown but by the time you get there you find yourself outkicked and half a stack short. These are hands that you want to steer clear of for the most part.

They are dominated hands and should be avoided at all costs unless you can get in cheap from late position. They don't make many straights or flushes and when they hit a pair you'll find yourself on the losing end of the kicker battle more often than not. Everything else is trash and should not be played even if it is suited. Suited trash is still trash. The importance of position can't be overstated. Many people think they understand the concept of playing in position but they routinely call raises with marginal hands only to play the rest of the hand out of position.

This is a leak that costs you money. When you're out of position you're playing a guessing game - you have to anticipate what your opponent may do. They dictate the flow of the hand: Which is why being in position is so important: You get last say on everything. If you want to see a free showdown you do; if you want to value-town someone, you do. Your opponents will be guessing, just as you are when you're out of position.

As the better player, with the advantage of being in position, you'll ensure that they're guessing wrong more often than right. Sit back and wait for a good hand. Don't get involved just because you're bored. Er gibt die Karten, es sei denn, er wird durch die Anwesenheit eines Croupiers von dieser Pflicht entbunden Casino, Turniere, etc.

Discard im Draw Poker das Tauschen einer bzw. Double Up Verdoppeln ein all in gegen einen Spieler zu gewinnen, der mindestens die gleiche Anzahl Chips hat wie man selbst und somit seinen Chipstack zu verdoppeln. Draw eine Hand, die bestimmte Karten braucht, um sich wesentlich zu verbessern. Ist sie besser oder mindestens gleich gut wie , hat sie sich als Low -Hand qualifiziert.

Equity Gleichwertigkeit siehe Pot Odds. Exposed Card eine Karte, die beim Geben unabsichtlich aufgedeckt wurde. Family Pot eine Situation, bei der fast jeder Spieler den Flop sieht.

Final Table der letzte Tisch eines Turniers. Fish Fisch ein unerfahrener oder schlechter Spieler. Falls es zwischen dem Croupier Dealer am Tisch und einem oder mehreren Spielern Streitigkeiten gibt z.

Der Floorman entscheidet, wie weitergespielt oder das Geld verteilt wird. Free Card Spieler sehen eine Karte, ohne zuvor einen Einsatz gecallt zu haben. Wenn ein Spieler seine Chips verliert, ist er ausgeschieden. Gutshot Bauchschuss siehe Inside Straight Draw. Ein Pokerspiel zwischen zwei Spielern 2. High Card eine Hand, die keine Kombination bildet. Home Game ein Spiel, das in einer privaten Runde stattfindet.

Wird vor allem in Turnieren angewendet. Made Hand Gemachte Hand eine Hand, die sich nicht mehr verbessern muss. Eine Ausnahme stellt hierbei das all in dar. Offsuit Die Karten haben unterschiedliche Farben.

One Gapper Die Startkarten z. Outs die Karten, die einem Spieler helfen, seine Hand wesentlich zu verbessern. Pair Paar zwei Karten desselben Wertes. Pay Off mitzugehen, obwohl man kaum mehr eine Chance hat, die Hand zu gewinnen, andererseits aber Pot Committed. Pocket Pair Die eigenen verdeckten Karten bilden ein Paar. Poker ein Vierling wird auch als Poker bezeichnet. Position die Position, in der sich ein Spieler befindet; elementarer Bestandteil des Spiels.

Pot die Gesamtsumme aller Chips, die in eine Hand investiert werden. Rainbow ein Flop, dessen drei Karten jeweils verschiedene Farben haben.

STAY CONNECTED